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Stress can lead to very real issues

Many people are stressed out at work, and it can often feel like stress is just in your head. It's just something you have to deal with, on your own. However, medical experts note that stress can lead to very real physical issues. Some examples are as follows:

-- An increased heart rate.

-- Increased blood pressure. This can sometimes lead to a stroke, a heart attack or other such major issues.

-- Depression. Some people who are stressed may experience chronic depression, even when the rest of life is going well, and they could be at risk of having an emotional breakdown.

-- Headaches. At their worst, these can turn into migraines that make things like work and sleep all but impossible.

-- An upset stomach. For some, this is just a slight feeling of nausea that never goes away. Others may get it so bad that they actually vomit.

-- A loss of sex drive and desire.

-- Grinding teeth. This can lead to permanent damage that could be expensive to have fixed.

-- A whole host of smaller issues, such as general aches and pains, a ringing sound in the ears, sweaty palms, problems swallowing and a dry feeling in your mouth. You may also feel generally anxious all of the time, which can impact your social life.

Now, stress is naturally a part of life, and it's important to know how to deal with it. If you're being put under too much stress at work, though, and it's giving you these problems, it's important to know if you have the right to compensation in Texas.

Source: WebMD, "Stress Symptoms," accessed June 17, 2016

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